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. >> well-done. good job. >> coming up on c-span2, a look at egypt's parliamentary elections next month. that is followed by comcast ceo brian roberts on the future of cable and where technology is headed. then a look at the 10th anniversary of the iraq war with a discussion of how it has changed the middle east. and with congress on its spring recess this week we'll take the opportunity to show you booktv in prime time every week night. tonight, three books on u.s. innovation. it begins at 8:30 eastern. >> let's got straight to a personal topic. it has been, you've been on the commission since 2006. the chairman has been on i believe since 2009. his term is up. yours will be up next year. should we expect to see some turnover at the commission? >> you always expect to see turnover at the commission because we all have staggered terms. >> right. >> the past six years flown by very quickly and, we shall see. stay tuned. i get asked this question every couple of years. and when you've been there almost seven years you get asked at inflection points about this. i openly thinking about it b
university law society and the first female student to be elected and by this stage i was interested in social change. in ireland at that time time, there was a total equation of crime and i felt this was not allowing the private individual morality and also that there were non catholics and we should open up to minorities to respect to the viewpoint so in my inaugural address on law and morality i need some -- i made some recommendations we should legalize family planning and should not criminalize consenting behavior and we should not have suicide as a crime. i remember the speech caused in quite a fuss as it was new to the examination of the move to slightly larger audiences there was the moment of silence when i finished it i was worried they're less more than a decent applies but the thought was that is what students do maybe i have been more outspoken than others but then i was lucky to get fellowship to harvard university that was a wonderful year to be in harvard when i found they were questioning the immoral for of vietnam and escape -- is keeping the draft some of the civil
between who has the authority to regulate elections. the election clause of the constitution actually gives authority to both. but where is the line when one crosses or goes too far than the other does? so that's the issue before the court. it wasn't clear today that it's going to be an easy line to find. >> ifill: the reason why this arizona law exists is because arizona officials say there's a problem involving illegal or undocumented immigrants registering to vote fraudulently. is there any evidence... did they present evidence today that that's a big problem? >> no, not today. in fact, there was more argument on the other side that there is no problem. but what arizona is saying is there is also a problem with the federal law. the federal law doesn't require proof that citizenship. but the way it deals with citizenship as eligibility for registration is it requires the applicant who wants to register to vote to sign under oath that the applicant meets all of the requirements of the federal law. arizona's attorney general thomas horn today told the court that that was an honor roll
a technocratic government. we want elections. they're not being supported. so long as they focus on the plo, the reconciliation is going nowhere. on the israeli side, i'm worried about the decision making loop. you're losing a few people who are known for restraint on this issue, the defense minister, two agents part of the octet. they are gone. now you have a more dovish agent on iran, more hawkish on the palestinian issue, though he is not ideological. if you could convince him that there will be palestinian reciprocity, and they say things like to go states for two people, you'll see that he and his team will also adjust, but without reciprocity, they are not going to. you also have the head of the housing ministry, he used -- we used to have an orthodox person, or the ultraorthodox issue was the main issue. the head of the finance committee of the knesset -- it is a different consolation there that could make this more of an issue. this idea of a freeze beyond the barrier -- there are some people interested -- on the palestinian side, we will not justify the barrier. the college on the
after the israeli government has been sworn in after their elections, so it's very hard to see what exactly could be done on this trip to actually achieve some i kind of resumption of the negotiations. if he were going to try to do that, he would have gone later he would have had the secretary of state go out, try to set things up in that way and come in and try to convene the negotiations. he's chosen not to do that and i think the reason for that is that he doesn't have himself high expectations that resumption of negotiations is achievable at the moment so i think his purpose is manage else which could help further on down the road and that purpose is to reintroduce himself to the israeli public in particular. they have gotten the impression that he doesn't like them, that he wants to distance the united states from israel, his standing in israeli public opinion is at 10 points, believe it or not, a poll taken last friday, and i think that that's a bum rap that he has. he doesn't deserve that. he's been very supportive in
wedding rings and all other parts of straight life. the karl rove winning elections and the abolitionists wing are in for a prolonged situation. 2014 will be tough, but once these two gangs, the palin and rove crowds, have to meet again in 2016, it's not going to be pretty and sure as hell isn't going to be a marriage and that's "hardball" for now. thanks for being with us. "the ed show" starts right now. >>> good evening, americans, welcome to "the ed show." i'm michael eric dyson. elizabeth warren takes a stand for working class americans. michele bachmann has seen the light on infrastructure and might be getting off the appalachain trail and heading back to washington and a southern pastor makes a radical stand for justice. but tonight, we start with the tenth anniversary of the ed show. let's get to work. the shock and awe campaign was launched against -- a decade later, the forces behind with trying to revise that history. today, donald rumsfeld tweeted ten years ago, the long, difficult work of liberating 25 million iraqis deserve our respect and appreciation. put aside for the mome
and listen to the president on this. >> we're after an election now. i think it is important for us to find out exactly what happened in benghazi and i'm happy to cooperate in any ways that congress wants and we have provided every bit of information that we have and we will continue to provide information, everything about that, we've had more testimony and more paper provided to congress than ever before, and congress is sort of running out of things to ask. >> well, look, the president's preamble to the statement says it all. we're after an election. before the election, after this happened on the anniversary of 9/11 the president was less than truthful with the american people and tried to keep a lid on this for his own political purposes, didn't match his message. after the election he claims he's given everything. what more can we give. we've given papers. mr. president it's not the papers that you give it's the papers that are relevant and the identification of the witnesses who were there and experienced the attacks and responded to the attacks and saved livelis. these are the peopl
to the specifics. watch for the senators from red states up for re-election and the pressure is greatest on them. they are away two weeks now from washington, back home, and there will be pressure on them. they will hear from their constituents about what to do from this. if you don't have much support, if any, among republicans, you need those democrats to get it through. >> hey, mark, give me a sense of harry reid's role in this. he wants to keep that title senate majority leader. navigating through these ice floes of this. >> it's already on the side of those who would like to see a large package, including a pretty big risk background check provision. it's not clear to me what more opponents can be to put pressure on senator reid. senator reid has a long history with the nra. they did not support him in his re-election race and i think he is looking for a path that not only protects his own views on gun control and not only tries to accommodate the white house but try to protect the majority. i think he is very stensive not just on guns but a range of issues too. all of these democrats are u
was going through your mind? >> you know, for me, i'm elected to congress and i take every vote seriously, but the vote to invade a sovereign nation, put our fighting americans at risk and go into this country, it has to be taken very seriously. and i've had several of these votes, of course. but what i look at is this country a threat to our national security. we had the classified briefings. with don rumsfeld and cheney and the whole group. they kept saying we have the weapons of mass destruction. there was a pesky little group of us and we kept saying show us the evidence. show us the evidence. they say, don't worry, we have the evidence. i'm not going to vote to send our fighting men and women into another country and waste all those lives and billions of dollars. just based on frankly on dick cheney's assurance, so i voted no. people did not believe that the white house would lie to them, and so they believed that iraq had these weapons, but they didn't and there was never proof they did. >> was it the fact there was no proof that led to your vote? were you objecting to the rush to j
direction the national democrats want to and winning elections with that approach. there is a lot to be learned both by the failure of the romney campaign in the senate races in the success of the republicans have had at the state level. >> host: we are taking your calls with grover norquist with americans for tax reform. our farmland or open democrats (202)585-3880 and republicans (202)585-3881. grover norquist known as an expert on some of these budget issues. you bring up the senate budget that we saw from budget chairwoman patty murray last week. talk about that and how you think it compares to paul ryan's budget? >> there are two major differences and they certainly going different directions. paul ryan's budget balances in 10 years and is not raise taxes and patty murray's budget never balances and raises taxes $1.5 trillion over the next decade. what the democrats and patty murray are saying in addition to the 600 million-dollar tax increase that obama won in january and they trillion dollars of obamacare tax increases that most americans are unaware of and they don't know
the election. >> look, when you're in the business of trying to form a compromise, get the other side to even come to the table with some commonsense ideas, i'm not surprised that the president is a little lower than 50%. but, you know, we have a budget now, we have a moral document, a blueprint for the policy debates that are going to take place this summer. one of the interesting things that i enjoyed watching was at 2:00 a.m., is that we got a chance to -- i don't get those other channels, george. but, they had an opportunity to talk about the keystone pipeline, they had an opportunity to talk about a biannual budget. this gave the senators more than an opportunity to talk about big issues as well as the budgetary. >> scored a lot of political points with all of those amendments. >> they did. and while this is a normal piece of legislative business, one does wonder why they did it at 5:00 in the morning? but it is a good thing they got it done. >> you're nodding your head? >> yes, it does seem a little strange that they work sometimes on the hill in a slightly banana republican-esque way.
in the presidential election. i talked to a top u.s. official the other day who put it this way, he said "they're stuck with each other." both of these guys just won elections. the president starting his second term. prime minister netanyahu put together his coalition government. iran is a huge policy issue, trying to restart the peace process is a huge issue, if they have a better personal relationship they can get things done. you saw first thing this morning the prime minister tries to crack a joke, he says if you can ditch your security detail, i have a fake mustache and we'll go out and have a few drinks in the bar. it's clear they're trying to at least for the public con sujs to show they're going to work together better on the personal side. >> good to see you, john king there, traveling with the president. >>> the israeli embassy released a video for president obama's trip. we want everybody to take a look at this. ♪ thank you for being a friend ♪ traveled down the road and back again ♪ >> i know. you're scratching -- rubbing your eyes saying am i believing this? those cutouts of
to get maryland to vote for john quincy adams the 1820 four election. >> how about the second question, how involved was she in the politics of the time? >> it has always been murky. there is no clear why between social politicking and the process leading to x number of votes being cast. one of the great skills begin with dolly madison, who understood that more could be achieved out of the committee room, off the floor of the house, in a social setting. louisa catherine is politically and attuned figure. i don't think you would find her dictating a platform. john quincy was 100 years ahead of his time. famously, in his first message to congress, -- remember this is a man whose legitimacy had been questioned. and yet, he introduced this breathtaking program that anticipates the new deal by 100 years. saying the federal government should we in the rowboat and business. there should be a national university and washington. he proposed a national astronomical observatory. a white house of the sky. for this, he was ridiculed by the jeffersonian small government crowd. it did nothing to enh
of the big clouds of july, that the presidential elections here in the u.s. has been lifted. and i think the u.s. will come with a very constructive position, having had time now, as requested, to study the document and make proposals to strengthen it. the challenge will be we're having a negotiation between 193 states who have raised different interests with regards to the arms trade and i think trying to find compromises that still produce a strong treaty will be where the challenge will be. it could be possible, there could be an agreement but could be a question of will that treaty make a difference? that will be a crucial element to discuss and consider during these two weeks. >> what about ongoing conflicts like the war in syria, for instance, whether or not the rebels should be armed? how do these conflicts play into those talks in new york? >> i think that's going to be a very interesting question. in the past a lot of civil society campaigners have pointed out the role played by russia, china and iran because they're supplying the government force there is and hoping the arms tr
of the capital. fighters said they want to hold democratic elections and urged civilians to remain calm. confusion, anger, and retribution. leftis what rebel fighters in their hunt for the capital. a man under attack is expected of being a rebel supporter. 70 kilometers outside the capital, the damage to buildings and the dead. south african forces have tried but failed to stop the advance. in the capital, pictures of what happened when the rebels took the city. it is feared the sort of retribution government supporters made out to their attackers will be overtaken by reprisals, score settling, along with looting. >> they have cut our phone networks. they are telling us, raping us, polluting. they are not allowing us to live. they have taken the state hostage. he had become an unpopular president, especially outside the capital. 10 years after he took power, he has suffered the same fate. only 10 weeks after the signing of a new power-sharing of peace deal. amidst celebrations, there was hope of some desperately needed stability. what was to follow was more death, more chaos, and suffer
the country. we talked to over 50,000 people about the election, things they perceived went well. what the other side went well and things we didn't do that people wished we did. it was a full-blown analysis from everything to mechanics to campaign finance laws. >> greta: one of the questions, the perception according to you, is that the republican party-- >> according to polling. >> greta: a party of rich-- yeah, polling. party of rich, narrow, stuffy, out of touch people and you want to reach the minority, female and young. >> greta: how do you convince you have anything for them if you're part of the rich, stuffy-- >> and obviously that's perception. part of is if you're not showing up in the community, the perception and narrative becomes reality. when we announced yesterday and today is that the national party -- in 2013, mind you, after a presidential election, that's never been done, is just going to spend just on the political oranges itself 10 million dollars which will include hundreds, a few people down the hallway, but hundreds of people in communities across the country ad
and that philosophy is viewed by about 57 of colorado's 62 elected sheriffs. i just think that, for instance, there's no way for me to know that a magazine is in possession of an individual we come in contact, was acquired before or after the ban. and i don't believe that a magazine capacity limitation will solve the problems we're facing with just about 15 minutes of practice, sir, i could have you -- you're doing a magazine exchange, in about two seconds. so the mass shooters could still fire the same number of rounds with only a limited extra number of seconds. >> right. but with respect, mr. sheriff, you're in a state, which has just brought in these laws. and one of the reasons they brought them in was what happened at that movie theater in aurora in colorado. where a deranged young man called holmes walked in and had four weapons, including assault rifles, and including 100 bullet magazines. now, you can't tell me that he could not have been stopped earlier if he hadn't had a magazine with 100 bullets in. and that's the point of this, isn't it? >> well, certainly, on the surface, it is. but,
and four red state democrats, who are up for re-election in 2014, also voted against it. we are joined now with the very latest on the last-minute scramble to get the deal done and where it goes from here. elizabeth? >> reporter: after 13 hours and 6 minutes, the senate narrowly approved the budget plan, passing 50-49. during the marathon session, senators were facing more than 500 amendment bus they voted on about 70. the vote-a-rama getting praise from the top members. >> i know everyone is exhausted. you may not feel at the moment. this is one of the finest days in the senate in recent years. >> reporter: the resolution raises nearly $1 trillion in new taxes. the government would still be in a deficit after ten years. senator patty murray argues the plan creates jobs and economic growth but, of course, during the process, patience did run thin. >> madam president, madam president, madam president. >> senate will come to order. >> madam president, the senate is not in order. i flow's a lot of march madness going on. we would like to keep it calm on the floor so that senators can be heard
crossover because they're getting ready to run for election. there is a game play in the senate. this administration wants to show the american public that we can't cut $44 billion between now and september 30 without them experiencing massive pain. they have every intention to make it hurt to get the point that we need to spends every penny we are spending. which is absolutely ludicrous. it's a shame they are doing that because a lot of things -- we are going to have air traffic control towers shut down. they are not shut down because they are too expensive. on average, they cost $wo.3 million less per year to operate. they are shut down to come back with unionized employees in the regular air tower system. so things are not what they seem. we don't have a problem in front of us that we can't solve. what we have is a lack of leadersship and direction to get there. you can compromise on how you save medicare and social security. those compromises have been discussed. they are available. but it's the politics of how we position ourselves so we look good and get re-elected and the
election of my life last fall. i had tracking cameras around me from st. patrick's day until november 6th, one to three cameras always focused on me trying to get a second or a minute that they could run against me in an ad. they didn't get a single second that they could run against me, not one second, by the way. [applause] but they're in the business of trying to undermine and weaken us, and i didn't back up on any principle. we debated the issue of life, and i said my opponent, my leftist opponent cannot answer two questions on life. is human life sacred in all of its forms? yes, it is. and at what moment does life begin? the instant of conception. and the people on the other side of this question dare not answer either one of those questions. they know they lose the debate. i stood on life, and i stood on marriage -- [applause] and the thing that a bunch of people that have been backing away from these challenges don't seem to realize that i'm still standing. [applause] now, why is that? i didn't run a campaign on jobs and the economy, jobbing and the economy, jobs and the economy an
have a pretty good chance? >> she has a so-so chance. the primary election within her party was sunday. so that's over with. but what she's doing right now is her own party to get reinstated on the ballot. she says she was discriminated against, a victim of slander. and there's no proof she did what is alleged, she should be allowed to run. >> that's the right point. none of this has been proven, how does she get banned? on what ground? >> the mexican system is not banning her. what happened is her own party after learning of these allegations, this is the p.a.n., most conservative party in mexico, the party itself said because of the allegations we would not like you to run and essentially stopped her from running and took her name off the ballot. but again the general election is in july and she still has a chance if the court system, the judicial system in mexico moves fast enough. >> so she's saying -- or they're saying she would simply be a distraction and maybe she needs to think about backing it up. >> i had an opportunity to speak with her. and what she was telling me is, liste
of california and jim antle. coming up the presidential election and tragedy of newtown the two biggest domestic policy priorities for president and democrats on capitol hill are overhauling the country's immigration laws and strengthening its gun laws. in the twin tales of how these priorities have fared in the first few months of the 113th congress reveal a lot about the political pressures republicans are and are not facing right now. on tuesday senate majority leader harry reid announced he would not include a measure sponsored by senator feinstein to ban assault weapons. instead he said it would be considered as an amendment. >> i want people to have the ability to vote on assault weapons, mental health, safety in schools, federal trafficking, clips, everything. but i cannot do that until i get a bill on the floor. right now her amendment using the most optimistic numbers has less than 40 votes. that's not 60. i have to get something on the floor so we can have votes on that issue and the other issues that i talked about. >> it's prompt this headline on wednesday from ""the onion"." the tim
for congress to wake up to our responsibility as elected officials and as stewards of this planet. the alarm has been sounded by the scientific community which overwhelmingly, overwhelmingly warns about the effects of our carbon dioxide emissions on our atmosphere and oceans. our defense and intelligence communities warn of the threats posed by climate change to national security and international stability. economists recognize the distortion of energy markets that overlook the true cost of carbon pollution, and government accountants now list climate change as a threat to our fiscal stability. now, today, as we enter the passover and easter season and as catholics the world over celebrate the selection of a new pope, we turn to voices of faith. they, too, call upon us. they call upon us to heed the moral imperatives of protecting creation and seeking justice for all people. they call upon us to reflect on our faith, on our relationship to our world and each other and on our responsibility to future generations. and they call upon us as president obama reminded us in his inaugural address t
hurt from the elections. and one of the criticisms leveled at him was he mismanaged the relationship with the united states. and here was the president all smiles and friendship and patting each other on the back. that was very good for mr. netanyahu. he relished it and he took advantage of it. but this was the first cause. the second cost somewhat less tasty for the prime minister. >> rose: what is less tasty for him? >> he himself endorsed or reendorsed the idea of two state solution for a palestinian state. but his concept of a state or his concept of a settlement is more modest than that of president obama. and when secretary of state kerry returns to the region in a short while to pursue the work, these differences will surface. they were not-- they came out unilaterally by the president in the speech but they will come up fully when secretary kerry returns to the region. >> rose: but how did barack obama come to the presidency with what attitudes did israel, what commitments, what sense of significance for him? >> i think you have two book ends to this story. the cairo speech o
>> andrea: we heard about the bogus war on women in election cycle. a real war on women in middle east. a girl was shot by n the head by the taliban in her home country and was rushed to the hospital in brit tape. air lifted and she survived. today was her first day back at school. she had the could remember to speak out against violence against women due to radical islamic policy. a real hero. happy she is back in school. >> dana: i'm switching gears. toilet paper. very important thing to have. everywhere you go. have it at the office. windsor, missouri. the public employees, the male public employees told they had to bring their open toilet paper to work because of budgetary concerns. when the aldermen heard about this, they thought it was a joke. it's true because they said the men were like, they were use toog much toilet paper. that is really not usually the stereotype. i got this fresh from the bat bathroom >> greg: that is how you roll. >> andrea: what if you forget? a huge problem in missouri. this is not because of the sequester either. >> eric: these are the picks. louis
community, particularly during this last election, who saw benjamin netanyahu cozying up to mitt romney, who were very skeptical about the president and israel. i think this trip as john king was saying earlier makes it very clear particularly when the president on the question of iran said all options are on the table, period, the president made it very clear as he said in his speech today, you are not alone. so i think domestically, politically, this trip is only good for the president. it makes him be seen as a leader. next to benjamin netanyahu these two men need each other in many ways right now and i think that is why you see this relationship blossoming. >> richard haas do you think anything is going to come of this? will there be a peace process any time soon? >> again, the situation is decidedly unripe given the divisions of the palestinians, the israeli government is not a government that was elected to make peace. this was a government that was elected to deal with the special privileges of the orthodox within israeli society. you got the turbulence in egypt. you will have turbule
's not a problem if you're a governor who has got to think about election in a few years. >> no. it will help him an awful lot. but i tell you what, if you are a state rep up from where i'm from. >> totally different. >> somebody says, hey, you want to support president obama's obama care provision on medicaid? ask charlie crist. the correct answer is, no, i did not. yeah, ask charlie crist. >> we don't have time for michele bachmann? >> no, we don't. maybe later. >> dr. brzezinski is coming up. >> dr. zbigniew brzezinski will be here and reince priebus and senator chris coons and jean chatzky. >> they are both good guys. >> steele said he beat him in a cage match. >> really? >> as if anybody was wondering. >> can "morning joe" host that? >> i would like to. like they are doing over on "headline news." what is happening there? i have no idea. somebody asked me about that. i don't even know what is going on, but apparently there is some sex trial going on. do you guys know? who is the name? >> i don't know. >> arias. what is the name? >> if barnicle doesn't know it, nobody does. >> jodi arias. >>
friend bebe. he knows, benjamin netanyahu just won re-election like the president has. the netanyahu is likely to be in the job for a while. he is fated to have to deal with him. so it makes sense to have this kind of at least, get the relationship back into at least a, some kind of, lack of hostility at a minimum. jon: it was written in one of the papers that the president offered to israel or israelis the kind of warm embrace that they are accustomed to getting from american presidents but they hadn't gotten from this president up till now. >> no, they haven't. there is no question about that. in fact the first term was full of testy exchanges and i think that the president thought, okay, i can twist israel's arm and make them do this. it turns out he really can't. he needs their trust. now he also went to ramallah and met with the palestinian authority leader where they were a lot warier about u.s. commitments and you think he discovered that, there is still a long, way, jon, for there to go between if we get peace between the palestinians and israelis. it is an interesting questi
elections? >> well it is critical. you stop and think about this. of course let's focus here on the senate, not the house. what you have is, you have i think it is 10 democratic senators who are unaring in states that were won by mitt romney. so you have them very cautious about upsetting gun owners and upsetting powerful forces, forces with dollars to spend on campaigns like the nra. gun hobbyists who of course vote and turn out in big numbers behind this issue. this is an issue that will bring out voters to the polls. this is why you had not seen any motion on gun control before newtown. the president despite the concern of people who are gun enthusiasts had not taken any action. feinstein, senator feinstein had not taken any action even though the assault weapons ban had expired just about 10 years earlier. so you see the change. jenna: let's a little bit about that because dianne feinstein says she is disappointed in this. she said if you think congress would listen and clearly listened to the nra. a lot of fingers point to the nra as the reason behind the fact this part of the legisla
most if notal of those senators re-elected. already it is a difficult prospect, and it w be made more difficult, reid fears, if they were asked to vote on this. >> woodruff: when senator feinstein says reid has promised hear, in essence, he will let her introduce an amendment there, will be a vote on the amendment, what are the prospickets it's going to get any easier then? >> reporter: as reid said very specifically yesterday, quite astonish will, he said he doesn't think it has even 40 votes but it will fulfill a promise he made on behalf of the president to hold an up-or-down vote on this measure even if it doesn't have support. it has broad support in polling the "washington post" has done and pew has done and other groups but considering the breakdown of the senate where you need 60 votes in order to end debate on something and about that number-- well, you really need just about 50 for final passage but in order to get over the procedural hurdle in the senate you need 6015, maybe 20 are not comfortable voting for this and there certainly aren't enough republicans, either. >> woo
note here that the election of the prime minister for the coalition is a step forward. we look forward to working with him in the weeks ahead. we look forward to working with the congress as we seek to support the needs of the syrian people in their struggle to create a free, stable, and democratic syria. thank you. >> good morning chairman royce, ranking members, and members of this committee. this you for hosting hearing today. i am pleased to be able to appear before the committee with my colleagues. our offices work closely together to provide humanitarian aid to those affected by the violence in syria. the two-year anniversary coincides with another dark milestone. over one million refugees have fled syria. half of that number arrived in the last two months. i would like to share with you the approach taken to address the crisis and how it complements and reinforces what usaid does. refugeebe how the crisis is affecting the neighboring countries. i will not go into the details here. i invite questions from you on a very different set of situations we have seen in jordan, lebanon,
this week, both good and bad, about what direction the party needs to take to win national elections in the future. and one of the big areas of concern is with women voters. some of the recommendations from the report from the republican national committee include communications training, more women as surrogates, rapid response to attacks and more female candidates. joining me now is former republican governor of new jersey and former epa administrator christine todd-whitman, governor, thank you for spending some time. this is your party. this is a party in turmoil. i am putting it nicely. this is a party, i don't want to say at war with itself but a party that is divided in many ways. those suggestions, yes, more female candidates and more female surrogates. but in truth does that get you where you need to be with women voters and if not what does the republican party have to do? >> you've got to change the message. it's not about the messaging, it's the message. you can't just say we've got to say it better or we've got to send other people out. sending a woman out as a candidate
this vote, because there will be some democrats, up for re-election in red states, in states that traditionally vote republican, that may have a tough time casting a vote for this particular budget. because it doesn't balance. also, remember, that a number of these senators have never voted on a budget. martha: yeah. good point. >> the senate has never put one forward. this will be their first vote on a budget and this process will then get them on the record supporting this version. so it's, you know it is an important moment tomorrow. martha: sure is. what a great point. some have been around several years and never voted on a budget before. this will be a first-time experience. we hope they enjoy that part of the job. bret, thank you so much. see you tonight on "special report". bret baier. bill: 18 past the hour. secretary of state john kerry is under fire. why a group of lawmakers are saying that the state department is not doing enough to free an american pastor jailed in iran. an update on that. martha: an amazing discovery where a piece of of apollo history was just f
in this chambers, given public comment, i have always been in awe of the building, of you who sit our elected officials and our gracious and under, you know, some unique situations at times. and never did i think i would be honored. this is a tremendous honor to me. without my family, my husband mike, kevin and kelly, my heart, and there are three young people here who own my soul. julian, katie rose, [speaker not understood], and the wonderful people i have -- who make me look good. the board of russian hill neighbors, all of you, and i truly believe that collaboration and inclusion is a winner every time. and every time i come here and watch you do just that, it makes me feel like doing it a little bit better and i can't stop without thanking my parents for having the good sense to send me to 16 years of all women schooling. and for me having the good sense not to get kicked out of any of them. [laughter] >> so, with that, this is truly an honor that touches me deeply, and thank you. thank you all. (applause) >> following me in the alphabet is our district 10 colleague, supervisor malia coh
definitely did not do much to support obama in this re- election cycle. however these three short days in the middle east have done a lot to bridge these gaps. we saw benjamin netanyahu willing to be persuaded by president obama. i think we saw the israeli public, even though it may have started out with a deep mistrust towards obama, it ended this week with a lot of affection. maybe it did manage to bridge some of these gaps. ,ost: after a two state evening he arrived on wednesday, meeting with the israeli prime minister. thursday he traveled to the west bank and met with the palestinian authority president. friday, meeting with the king of playing tourist yesterday and returning to washington at 8:00 last evening. the israeli prime minister, benjamin netanyahu, asked about the ambitions of iran when it comes to your -- nuclear weapons. here is more. [video clip] >> we had an opportunity to begin discussing a wide range of issues critical to our countries. foremost among these is the iranian fault -- relentless pursuit of nuclear weapons. mr. president, you have made it clear the you'
. and this is when we had a much more successful election, the parliamentarian elections and so forth. there was an opportunity, i believe, at that stage to consolidate some gains and to move toward a sustainable political outcome. and we know that some of those efforts failed or weren't sufficient to consolidate those gains. and so the future of iraq is, obviously, very much in question beyond this point, but i think it's very important to understand that these conflicts evolve over time, and we're fighting enemies there who have a say in the future course of events, and we need to talk more about those enemies. what are they trying to achieve, what are their goals, what are their strategies? because then we could inform the public about what the stakes are. but instead we talk about only us, and we talk about only our number of troops and what we did and as if everything we did led to the outcome without any interaction with those against whom we're fighting. >> let's open the conversation now, and -- [laughter] i think what we'll do given the number of hands i see is we'll take two
to spend millions of dollars to try to get re-elected back to the security kournl every four years. now i'm saying you have a seat. it's a win-win-1 formula for the small states, the middle powers and great powers. at the end of the day, eventually, not right away, the 7-7-7 formula can break the current log jam in security council reform. >> the great thing about the book is there's a lot of insight at 30,000 feet and also a lot of insight at the ground level because you have lived through these processes. pleasure to have you on. >> my pleasure. thank you for having me on. >>> when we come back, the story of the world's most innovative city. it's not london or singapore. you will be very surprised. hey. they're coming. yeah. british. later. sorry. ok...four words... scarecrow in the wind... a baboon... monkey? hot stew saturday!? ronny: hey jimmy, how happy are folks who save hundreds of dollars switching to geico? jimmy: happier than paul revere with a cell phone. ronny: why not? anncr: get happy. get geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more. but all i do to be bro
will indicate that through elections and primaries and referendums. i think one of the lessons of roe versus wade is when the court goes too far it weakens our respect for judicial institutions and they would be far better off to decide the two cases on the narrow west possible grounds. >> chris: you wouldn't want to see a sweeping decision against. >> it would further undermine respect for the judiciary. >> chris: senator bayh how far would you want the court to go? >> the second question involves trying to read the mind of justice kennedy. my guess is he would be reluctant to strike down the laws of 41 states that prohibit same-sex marriage or only allow civil unions. i think he will seek some sort of middle ground. >> chris: and what would you like to see? >> i think the time has come for society to accept this union between two individuals. i think it is from a conservative point of view individuals supporting one another, supporting their families so that society at large does not have to is good for the rest of us. >> chris: would you like to see the court declare a big constitutional
to $348 million. winners can elect to be paid out over 29 years or lump sum, which in this case is 221 million bucks. not too wade. people in 42 states, washington, dc, and u.s. virgin islands, all scrambled for powerball tickets until the last minute and here's the winning numbers: >> lottery officials have some advice. >> seek professional advice. contact their financial advise adviseer, a lawyer or c, and take their time what they're going to do before they claim the ticket. >> also important to sign the back of the ticket, but it in a safe place. it usually takes the winner to come forward, either because they don't know they're the winner or their planning to do something with the the fortunat. >> shepard: we'll be right back. s favorite recipes? just begin with america's favorite soups. bring out chicken broccoli alfredo. or best-ever meatloaf. go to campbellskitchen.com for recipes, plus a valuable coupon. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. i'm up next, but now i'm sging the heartburn blues. hold on, prilosec isn't for fast relief. cue up alka-seltzer. it stops heartburn
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